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JOHN WARD ADDRESSES MEMBERS OF CONGRESS – 11.12.01

November 12, 2001

Re: Conference on Aviation Security

Dear Representative:

On behalf of the 23,000 flight attendants at American Airlines, I cannot overstate the urgency in passing legislation on aviation security. The Federal Aviation Administration’s hands are tied on implementing many security procedures as they wait for the outcome of this legislation. Two months have passed since the tragic events of September 11; and, yet thousands of flight attendants and pilots go to work everyday without direction in how to best handle a security problem inflight. American has provided some guidance but other carriers have offered little. Consequently, the crews have been left to devise their own strategies-some of which could be extreme. Revised crew security training addressing the current environment must be a priority, yet it will continue to be overlooked until Congress takes action.

We urge you to pass the strongest legislation possible, as quickly as possible, which will provide security to flight crews and the traveling public. The latest breeches in security prove that the system must look and be different to reassure passengers that security is being dealt with in a new and enhanced way. We believe this means federalizing the screeners under the auspices of the Department of Justice. It also means screening airport employees as they enter the secured area, screening and searching all those with access to the airport property, screening checked bags, positive bag match, and limiting carry-on bags to one bag. Of course, impenetrable cockpit doors are a must. The FAA has acted aggressively in this area and we commend them. We also commend the DOT for increasing the number of sky marshals on flights. We hope this legislation will expand that even further.

As cockpit doors are being secured, flight attendants should be given some form of protection in the form of a non-lethal weapon and defense training. Legislation should provide for a study to determine the most effective means of providing this protection.

Again, it is imperative that Congress pass aviation security legislation soon. The well-being of the aviation industry depends on it. Contact me at 800-395-2732, Extension 8101, or APFA’s Washington Representative Joan Wages at 703-548-3676 with questions.

Sincerely,

John Ward, President APFA


November 12, 2001

Re: Conference on Aviation Security

Dear Senator:

On behalf of the 23,000 flight attendants at American Airlines, I cannot overstate the urgency in passing legislation on aviation security. The Federal Aviation Administration’s hands are tied on implementing many security procedures as they wait for the outcome of this legislation. Two months have passed since the tragic events of September 11; and, yet thousands of flight attendants and pilots go to work everyday without direction in how to best handle a security problem inflight. American has provided some guidance but other carriers have offered little. Consequently, the crews have been left to devise their own strategies-some of which could be extreme. Revised crew security training addressing the current environment must be a priority, yet it will continue to be overlooked until Congress takes action.

We urge you to pass the strongest legislation possible, as quickly as possible, which will provide security to flight crews and the traveling public. The latest breeches in security prove that the system must look and be different to reassure passengers that security is being dealt with in a new and enhanced way. We believe this means federalizing the screeners under the auspices of the Department of Justice. It also means screening airport employees as they enter the secured area, screening and searching all those with access to the airport property, screening checked bags, positive bag match, and limiting carry-on bags to one bag. Of course, impenetrable cockpit doors are a must. The FAA has acted aggressively in this area and we commend them. We also commend the DOT for increasing the number of sky marshals on flights. We hope this legislation will expand that even further.

As cockpit doors are being secured, flight attendants should be given some form of protection in the form of a non-lethal weapon and defense training. Legislation should provide for a study to determine the most effective means of providing this protection.

Again, it is imperative that Congress pass aviation security legislation soon. The well-being of the aviation industry depends on it. Contact me at 800-395-2732, Extension 8101, or APFA’s Washington Representative Joan Wages at 703-548-3676 with questions.

Sincerely,

John Ward, President APFA

APFA Headquarters
1004 West Euless Boulevard
Euless, Texas 76040

M-F: 9:00AM - 5:00PM (CT)
Phone: (817) 540-0108

Call APFA

Contract & Scheduling Desk
M-F: 7:00AM - 7:00PM (CT)
Phone: (817) 540-0108

Chat APFA

After-Hours Live Chat
M-F: 3:00PM - 11:00 PM (CT)
Sat-Sun: 9:00AM - 5:00PM (CT)

APFA Events

Currently, no scheduled events...

APFA Headquarters
1004 West Euless Boulevard
Euless, Texas 76040

M-F: 9:00AM - 5:00PM (CT)
Phone: (817) 540-0108

Call APFA

Contract & Scheduling Desk
M-F: 7:00AM - 7:00PM (CT)
Phone: (817) 540-0108

Chat APFA

After-Hours Live Chat
M-F: 3:00PM - 11:00 PM (CT)
Sat-Sun: 9:00AM - 5:00PM (CT)

APFA Events

Currently, no scheduled events...

APFA Headquarters
1004 West Euless Boulevard
Euless, Texas 76040

M-F: 9:00AM - 5:00PM (CT)
Phone: (817) 540-0108

Call APFA

Contract & Scheduling Desk
M-F: 7:00AM - 7:00PM (CT)
Phone: (817) 540-0108

Chat APFA

After-Hours Live Chat
M-F: 3:00PM - 11:00 PM (CT)
Sat-Sun: 9:00AM - 5:00PM (CT)

APFA Events

Currently, no scheduled events...

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