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Safety & Security

Contact Information

Andrew Rhinehart - Safety & Security Chair
[email protected]
Office: (817) 540-0108 ext. 8302
Base Representative Contacts

Notification System
APFA ANS Privacy Policy
Critical Incidents: 817-357-8786

(682) 315-7070

Call Daily Ops when:
— Sick on layover
— Crew member isn’t present for pickup
— Clearance to print off IFM info when tablet is lost or missing
— Emergency support is needed when flight deck is not onboard
— During emergencies that may arise while on layover

MOD can be useful for a multitude of situations while at the gate in a hub. AA IOC MOD: (682) 315-8000

BOS
(617) 874-9275 | Hours: 04:00-20:00

CLT
(704) 359-3779 | Hours: 05:00-22:00

DCA
Terminal C North Pier: (571) 473-4100
Terminal C South Pier: (571) 473-4124
Hours: SUN-FRI 05:00-22:30, SAT 05:00-21:00

DFW
(972) 425-5140
Hours: Terminal A: 06:00-18:30
Terminal C: 05:30-22:30
Terminal D 10:00-22:30

LAX
(310) 215-7022 | Hours: 05:00-21:45

LGA
(718) 476-4320 | Hours: 04:30-19:30

JFK
(718) 487-7882 or (718) 487-7883
Hours: 05:00-23:30

MIA
(786) 591-2900 | Hours: 07:00-20:00

ORD
(773) 686-2615
Hours: SUN/MON/THUR/FRI 04:30-22:00, TUE/WED/SAT 04:30-21:00

PHL
Terminal A: (610) 362-1700 | Hours: 05:00-22:00
Terminal B: (610) 362-4100 | Hours: 05:00-20:30

PHX
(480) 693-2945 | Hours: 06:00-21:00

Andrew Rhinehart - Safety & Security Chair
[email protected]
Office: (817) 540-0108 ext. 8302
Base Representative Contacts

Notification System
APFA ANS Privacy Policy
Critical Incidents: 817-357-8786

(682) 315-7070

Call Daily Ops when:
— Sick on layover
— Crew member isn’t present for pickup
— Clearance to print off IFM info when tablet is lost or missing
— Emergency support is needed when flight deck is not onboard
— During emergencies that may arise while on layover

MOD can be useful for a multitude of situations while at the gate in a hub. AA IOC MOD: (682) 315-8000

BOS
(617) 874-9275 | Hours: 04:00-20:00

CLT
(704) 359-3779 | Hours: 05:00-22:00

DCA
Terminal C North Pier: (571) 473-4100
Terminal C South Pier: (571) 473-4124
Hours: SUN-FRI 05:00-22:30, SAT 05:00-21:00

DFW
(972) 425-5140
Hours: Terminal A: 06:00-18:30
Terminal C: 05:30-22:30
Terminal D 10:00-22:30

LAX
(310) 215-7022 | Hours: 05:00-21:45

LGA
(718) 476-4320 | Hours: 04:30-19:30

JFK
(718) 487-7882 or (718) 487-7883
Hours: 05:00-23:30

MIA
(786) 591-2900 | Hours: 07:00-20:00

ORD
(773) 686-2615
Hours: SUN/MON/THUR/FRI 04:30-22:00, TUE/WED/SAT 04:30-21:00

PHL
Terminal A: (610) 362-1700 | Hours: 05:00-22:00
Terminal B: (610) 362-4100 | Hours: 05:00-20:30

PHX
(480) 693-2945 | Hours: 06:00-21:00

Safety & Security Department Advisories

Cabin LOSA Memorandum of Understanding between AA and APFA

The Cabin LOSA Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), is now available for view. For those seeking more information on the agreement as well as details about the program you can view the document here.

Read the Cabin LOSA Holtines for More Information: Facts About Cabin LOSA (2.09.23) and An Update on Cabin LOSA (2.27.23)

Cabin Air Reporting: Hot Cabin and SOF (Smoke, Odor, and Fumes)

If ever faced with a hot cabin or SOF event, please follow the outlined procedures in the IFM and file a Cabin ASAP as well as a CERS report. We also encourage that you fill out a Hot Cabin Report Form that may be found here on our webpage or file a Smoke, Odor, Fume Event Report Form.

Please refer to the most recent hotline for more information.

Changes to Departure Procedures

Beginning April 03, 2023, gate agents will be tasked with closing the aircraft door. Should the aircraft door be closed without verbal confirmation that it is safe to do so by the Lead Flight Attendant/ Purser, please report with a Cabin ASAP as well as a CERS as it’s an FAR Violation.

Read the Holtine for More Information

Safety & Security Hotlines

1.25.24 – New! APFA Notification System for Critical Incidents

American Airlines Inflight Management is responsible for providing the proper support Flight Attendants need when experiencing a critical incident while on duty, and communicating with APFA is an integral part of that responsibility.

Continue Reading

1.06.24 – Alaska Airlines Boeing 737 MAX-9 Groundings

Following an incident last night on an Alaska Airlines Boeing 737 MAX-9 where the emergency exit door panel blew outward from the aircraft shortly after take-off, the FAA has ordered the grounding of several Boeing 737 MAX-9 configurations for investigation.

Continue Reading

10.13.23 – Layover Safety

APFA has been made aware of global protest/demonstration alerts this weekend. Please expect larger crowds and perhaps road closures near and around layovers. Continue Ready for Action to Take

Continue Reading

9.28.23 – Required Update to Comply365 Effective Wednesday, October 4

This week a mobileCCI message was sent to all Flight Attendants regarding a required update to Comply365 version 8.2 on the EFB, with an effective date of Wednesday, October 4, 2023.

Continue Reading

9.23.23 – Cabin LOSA Observations to Begin Late October

Safety is the highest priority for us as Flight Attendants, and certain requirements of current AA Safety programs have yet to be fully implemented per the regulations and standards of the FAA.

Continue Reading

9.01.23 – Turbulence Safety Reminders

When encountering turbulence, It is important to remain seated and secure yourself as quickly as possible. If you are in the aisle performing a service, brace the cart by wedging it between aisle seats

Continue Reading

8.11.23 – CQ: Final Targeted Training and Special Tracking

This hotline aims to help you understand the process if you are ever unsuccessful at CQ and remind you that APFA Safety and Security is here to support you throughout all aspects of your flight attendant duties, including your annual CQ training.

Continue Reading

7.11.23 – New Smoke/Odor/Fume (SOF) Event Report Form AND Call to Action!

New Smoke/Odor/Fume (SOF) Event Report Form and Call to Action! Tuesday, July 11, 2023 In this Hotline: – 2023 GCAQE Conference – New Smoke/Odor/Fume (SOF) Report Form – Click here…

Continue Reading

1.25.24 – New! APFA Notification System for Critical Incidents

American Airlines Inflight Management is responsible for providing the proper support Flight Attendants need when experiencing a critical incident while on duty, and communicating with APFA is an integral part of that responsibility.

Continue Reading

1.06.24 – Alaska Airlines Boeing 737 MAX-9 Groundings

Following an incident last night on an Alaska Airlines Boeing 737 MAX-9 where the emergency exit door panel blew outward from the aircraft shortly after take-off, the FAA has ordered the grounding of several Boeing 737 MAX-9 configurations for investigation.

Continue Reading

10.13.23 – Layover Safety

APFA has been made aware of global protest/demonstration alerts this weekend. Please expect larger crowds and perhaps road closures near and around layovers. Continue Ready for Action to Take

Continue Reading

Reporting

Smoke, Odor, & Fume

If you are currently experiencing symptoms: headache, bloody nose, chest tightness, profound fatigue, muscle aches, elevated blood pressure, sinus congestion and/or a persistent cough.

1. Contact the Inflight Daily Operations Desk at IOC at 1-682-315-7070
- Inform them that you are experiencing smoke, odor, fume symptoms or injury along with the Flight # and where the event occurred.
- You will also inform them of your need to seek necessary and immediate medical treatment at the nearest hospital (not urgent care) for proper testing of possible exposure with their assistance.

2. Call APFA Notification system phone number: 817-357-8786 and choose prompt #2 (Cabin Odor/Fume Event)

3. When arriving to the hospital advise the nurses at check-in that you need to be seen immediately because you have been exposed to fumes and need to have your blood tested for Carbon Monoxide exposure, and there is only a four-hour window to detect this type of exposure.

4. After arriving at the hospital, you may contact MedAire for exposure to SOF events by calling 1-877-346-9174 / 1-480-333-3801 for additional assistance at the hospital if you are having issues being seen right away.

5. You must file an IOD 1-844-777-8463 or click here to review the APFA IOD Packet to see how to file and IOD.

6. Document the event with a CERS Report under the topic of ‘Fire/Smoke/Fumes/Odor’ and with a Cabin ASAP Report under ‘General or Specific Cabin Safety Concern > Fire/ Smoke/ Odor.’

If you need further assistance, you may speak with the Safety and Security Rep on Duty at 817-540-0108 EXT 1,4,1,1 or [email protected] or speak with an EAP rep at 833-214-2002 or [email protected]

For questions about pay, sick time, personal days, or further support please reach out to your local base leadership. Their contact information may be found on the Bases Page, or you may use the Base Contact Form on the APFA website.

Download this checklist

Read more about Smoke, Odor, & Fume events or file a Smoke, Odor, Fume Event Report with APFA

Safety at American Airlines

Reporting

Reporting is the primary method of driving change within the company. Through reporting, trending hazards are identified and working groups come together (including APFA) to determine mitigations for those hazards. CERS and Cabin ASAP reports are the two most used methods of reporting for Flight Attendants.

Safety Management Systems (SMS) at AA

Safety Management Systems (SMS) is the method the company employs to managing safety risks. There are four pillars of SMS:

Safety Policy – Senior management’s commitment to the continuous improvement of safety.
Safety Risk Management – The process of identifying and controlling risks.
Safety Assurance – Evaluates whether the implemented controls are effective.
Safety Promotion - Advocates for positive engagement in safety culture with all workgroups.

Just Culture™

Just Culture fosters trust in reporting systems so that employees feel empowered to report things. It is anchored in a learning culture instead of a blaming culture. It ensures that employees are treated fairly if they make an error or at-risk choice. Cabin ASAP uses Just Culture when investigating reports.

Cabin ASAP

What is Cabin ASAP?

The American Airlines Cabin Aviation Safety Action Program (Cabin ASAP) is designed for Flight Attendants to report and the Company to identify and correct specific safety issues at American Airlines. The program provides a voluntary, cooperative, and non-punitive environment for the open self-reporting of cabin safety concerns. Through such reporting, valuable information is learned that may not otherwise be obtainable.

Objective

The objective of the Cabin ASAP Program is to promote safety. How we accomplish this objective is by identifying cabin safety concerns. Learning what Flight Attendants experience out on the line is the best tool for improving safety.

Cabin ASAP promotes safety through the following essential steps:

    • Identifying hazards (most critical)
    • Analyzing risks
    • Accomplishing corrective solutions
    • Validating and verifying effectiveness
    • Educating and increasing employee awareness
    • Measuring overall system performance
    • Ensuring a continuing system of accountability

APFA encourages Flight Attendants to submit all safety concerns into the ASAP Program. The more data that is gathered, the more systemic issues can be identified and fixed.

Reports are confidential and may not be discussed or shared with any members outside of the ASAP Event Review Committee (ERC). If needed, the ERC may decide to share a de-identified report outside of ASAP to further investigate the safety concern or for information gathering. The ERC may also elect to contact a submitter for further information. An APFA ASAP ERC member will make these contacts. Contact with a submitter over the phone or in person is considered an extension of the ASAP report and all confidentiality rules will apply. Additionally, the APFA ERC member may request more information from a submitter to share with the rest of the ERC. The ASAP ERC is composed of three members: An APFA ASAP Representative, an FAA Inspector, and a representative from American Airline’s Safety Department.

Flight Service is not involved in the ASAP process. All ASAP reports are confidential, and once submitted, the report remains within the ASAP program.

CERS

When you submit a CERS report, it is sent to Daily Ops for processing. The information is then compiled and sent to various people across several departments including but not limited to your FSM and APFA Safety & Security.

For assistance completing a CERS report, call the MOD at your base.

Reasons to File a CERS:

    • Any event or hazard that would need to be brought to the company’s attention to strengthen inflight safety, security, operations, as well as policies and procedures.
    • Emergency landing
    • Turbulence, whether it be light, moderate, severe, or there’s a reported injury
    • Medical Emergency, including the use of medical equipment as well as if any contact was made to bodily fluids or infectious disease
    • Passenger and crew member illness/injury
    • If any emergency equipment isn’t present onboard during equipment checks
    • Decompression
    • Security related event, or security concern with passenger
    • Passenger misconduct
    • Inadvertent Slide Deployment
    • Hot Cabin (with ASAP) or Cabin Cleanliness issue
    • Operational issues: UMs, boarding issues, suspected human trafficking, hotel transportation issues to and from the airport for layovers
    • Events occurring while on layover that need to be brought to the attention of the company

Fatigue

Instances of fatigue can be reported through Cabin ASAP.

APFA encourages Flight Attendants to submit all safety concerns into the ASAP Program. The more data that is gathered, the more systemic issues can be identified and fixed.

Reports are confidential and may not be discussed or shared with any members outside of the ASAP Event Review Committee (ERC). If needed, the ERC may decide to share a de-identified report outside of ASAP to further investigate the safety concern or for information gathering. The ERC may also elect to contact a submitter for further information. An APFA ASAP ERC member will make these contacts. Contact with a submitter over the phone or in person is considered an extension of the ASAP report and all confidentiality rules will apply. Additionally, the APFA ERC member may request more information from a submitter to share with the rest of the ERC. The ASAP ERC is composed of three members: An APFA ASAP Representative, an FAA Inspector, and a representative from American Airline’s Safety Department.

Flight Service is not involved in the ASAP process. All ASAP reports are confidential, and once submitted, the report remains within the ASAP program.

If you are currently experiencing symptoms: headache, bloody nose, chest tightness, profound fatigue, muscle aches, elevated blood pressure, sinus congestion and/or a persistent cough.

1. Contact the Inflight Daily Operations Desk at IOC at 1-682-315-7070
- Inform them that you are experiencing smoke, odor, fume symptoms or injury along with the Flight # and where the event occurred.
- You will also inform them of your need to seek necessary and immediate medical treatment at the nearest hospital (not urgent care) for proper testing of possible exposure with their assistance.

2. Call APFA Notification system phone number: 817-357-8786 and choose prompt #2 (Cabin Odor/Fume Event)

3. When arriving to the hospital advise the nurses at check-in that you need to be seen immediately because you have been exposed to fumes and need to have your blood tested for Carbon Monoxide exposure, and there is only a four-hour window to detect this type of exposure.

4. After arriving at the hospital, you may contact MedAire for exposure to SOF events by calling 1-877-346-9174 / 1-480-333-3801 for additional assistance at the hospital if you are having issues being seen right away.

5. You must file an IOD 1-844-777-8463 or click here to review the APFA IOD Packet to see how to file and IOD.

6. Document the event with a CERS Report under the topic of ‘Fire/Smoke/Fumes/Odor’ and with a Cabin ASAP Report under ‘General or Specific Cabin Safety Concern > Fire/ Smoke/ Odor.’

If you need further assistance, you may speak with the Safety and Security Rep on Duty at 817-540-0108 EXT 1,4,1,1 or [email protected] or speak with an EAP rep at 833-214-2002 or [email protected]

For questions about pay, sick time, personal days, or further support please reach out to your local base leadership. Their contact information may be found on the Bases Page, or you may use the Base Contact Form on the APFA website.

Download this checklist

Read more about Smoke, Odor, & Fume events or file a Smoke, Odor, Fume Event Report with APFA

Reporting

Reporting is the primary method of driving change within the company. Through reporting, trending hazards are identified and working groups come together (including APFA) to determine mitigations for those hazards. CERS and Cabin ASAP reports are the two most used methods of reporting for Flight Attendants.

Safety Management Systems (SMS) at AA

Safety Management Systems (SMS) is the method the company employs to managing safety risks. There are four pillars of SMS:

Safety Policy – Senior management’s commitment to the continuous improvement of safety.
Safety Risk Management – The process of identifying and controlling risks.
Safety Assurance – Evaluates whether the implemented controls are effective.
Safety Promotion - Advocates for positive engagement in safety culture with all workgroups.

Just Culture™

Just Culture fosters trust in reporting systems so that employees feel empowered to report things. It is anchored in a learning culture instead of a blaming culture. It ensures that employees are treated fairly if they make an error or at-risk choice. Cabin ASAP uses Just Culture when investigating reports.

What is Cabin ASAP?

The American Airlines Cabin Aviation Safety Action Program (Cabin ASAP) is designed for Flight Attendants to report and the Company to identify and correct specific safety issues at American Airlines. The program provides a voluntary, cooperative, and non-punitive environment for the open self-reporting of cabin safety concerns. Through such reporting, valuable information is learned that may not otherwise be obtainable.

Objective

The objective of the Cabin ASAP Program is to promote safety. How we accomplish this objective is by identifying cabin safety concerns. Learning what Flight Attendants experience out on the line is the best tool for improving safety.

Cabin ASAP promotes safety through the following essential steps:

  • Identifying hazards (most critical)
  • Analyzing risks
  • Accomplishing corrective solutions
  • Validating and verifying effectiveness
  • Educating and increasing employee awareness
  • Measuring overall system performance
  • Ensuring a continuing system of accountability

APFA encourages Flight Attendants to submit all safety concerns into the ASAP Program. The more data that is gathered, the more systemic issues can be identified and fixed.

Reports are confidential and may not be discussed or shared with any members outside of the ASAP Event Review Committee (ERC). If needed, the ERC may decide to share a de-identified report outside of ASAP to further investigate the safety concern or for information gathering. The ERC may also elect to contact a submitter for further information. An APFA ASAP ERC member will make these contacts. Contact with a submitter over the phone or in person is considered an extension of the ASAP report and all confidentiality rules will apply. Additionally, the APFA ERC member may request more information from a submitter to share with the rest of the ERC. The ASAP ERC is composed of three members: An APFA ASAP Representative, an FAA Inspector, and a representative from American Airline’s Safety Department.

Flight Service is not involved in the ASAP process. All ASAP reports are confidential, and once submitted, the report remains within the ASAP program.

When you submit a CERS report, it is sent to Daily Ops for processing. The information is then compiled and sent to various people across several departments including but not limited to your FSM and APFA Safety & Security.

For assistance completing a CERS report, call the MOD at your base.

Reasons to File a CERS:

  • Any event or hazard that would need to be brought to the company’s attention to strengthen inflight safety, security, operations, as well as policies and procedures.
  • Emergency landing
  • Turbulence, whether it be light, moderate, severe, or there’s a reported injury
  • Medical Emergency, including the use of medical equipment as well as if any contact was made to bodily fluids or infectious disease
  • Passenger and crew member illness/injury
  • If any emergency equipment isn’t present onboard during equipment checks
  • Decompression
  • Security related event, or security concern with passenger
  • Passenger misconduct
  • Inadvertent Slide Deployment
  • Hot Cabin (with ASAP) or Cabin Cleanliness issue
  • Operational issues: UMs, boarding issues, suspected human trafficking, hotel transportation issues to and from the airport for layovers
  • Events occurring while on layover that need to be brought to the attention of the company

Instances of fatigue can be reported through Cabin ASAP.

APFA encourages Flight Attendants to submit all safety concerns into the ASAP Program. The more data that is gathered, the more systemic issues can be identified and fixed.

Reports are confidential and may not be discussed or shared with any members outside of the ASAP Event Review Committee (ERC). If needed, the ERC may decide to share a de-identified report outside of ASAP to further investigate the safety concern or for information gathering. The ERC may also elect to contact a submitter for further information. An APFA ASAP ERC member will make these contacts. Contact with a submitter over the phone or in person is considered an extension of the ASAP report and all confidentiality rules will apply. Additionally, the APFA ERC member may request more information from a submitter to share with the rest of the ERC. The ASAP ERC is composed of three members: An APFA ASAP Representative, an FAA Inspector, and a representative from American Airline’s Safety Department.

Flight Service is not involved in the ASAP process. All ASAP reports are confidential, and once submitted, the report remains within the ASAP program.

Flight Attendant Policies & Procedures

Minimum Crew

Minimum crew violations continue to rise, and these violations usually result in punitive action taken against Flight Attendants. Fines may also be levied against American. If you are involved in a minimum crew violation, always remember to file an ASAP report immediately and contact your base representative.

crewairplane2

Communication between Flight Attendants and agents is the most effective way to ensure minimum crew violations are avoided. If a Flight Attendant needs to leave the aircraft for any reason, the Flight Attendant must “scan-off,” so the agents know that the minimum crew is not onboard. When a Flight Attendant scans off, the system prevents the start of boarding. The scan-off procedure was tested in LAX earlier this year. The Company has now decided to implement the procedure system-wide. This will allow for improved communication between Flight Attendants and agents, and can also protect Flight Attendants from being wrongly charged with departure delays.

Minimum crew violations continue to rise, and these violations usually result in punitive action taken against Flight Attendants. Fines may also be levied against American. If you are involved in a minimum crew violation, always remember to file an ASAP report immediately and contact your base representative.

Communication between Flight Attendants and agents is the most effective way to ensure minimum crew violations are avoided. If a Flight Attendant needs to leave the aircraft for any reason, the Flight Attendant must “scan-off,” so the agents know that the minimum crew is not onboard. When a Flight Attendant scans off, the system prevents the start of boarding. The scan-off procedure was tested in LAX earlier this year. The Company has now decided to implement the procedure system-wide. This will allow for improved communication between Flight Attendants and agents, and can also protect Flight Attendants from being wrongly charged with departure delays.

crewairplane2

Recently, a deadheading Flight Attendant boarded before the minimum crew was onboard. American was forced to voluntarily self-disclose (VSD) these violations to the FAA. As a reminder, deadheading Flight Attendants are not considered part of the working crew and are not allowed to board until the minimum crew is onboard the aircraft.

Step 1

Once Boarding Begins

Flight Attendants are not permitted to leave the boarding door’s immediate vicinity unless performing safety-related duties. Flight Attendants should not return to the gate area unless there is a life-threatening emergency. IFM references may be found here:

  • In-Flight Manual (IFM) > Staffing Requirements > Minimum Crew Requirements >Stepping off Aircraft with Minimum Crew On Board
  • IFM > Security > Security Awareness > Crew Security > AA ID Verification

Step 2

When Leaving the Aircraft Before Customer Boarding

  • Notify FA 1 / Purser (or another crewmember if FA 1/Purser is not present) before deplaning the aircraft
  • Notify the agent (if they are at the gate) and scan the AA ID at the gate reader, or have the agent manually remove the Flight Attendant

Step 3

Upon Returning to the Gate and Aircraft

  • Notify the Gate Agent once at the gate and present ID for verification
  • The Gate Agent may require the returning Flight Attendant to scan their AA ID again at the gate reader activated for the flight
  • Notify FA 1 / Purser (or another crewmember if FA1 / Purser not present) of the return to the aircraft

iPhone Electronic Flight Bag (EFB) & In Flight Manual (IFM)

Methods to access your IFM

With the latest manual revision came significant changes to missing, inoperative, or out-of-date tablet procedures at non-base stations. There are now two new methods of ensuring you have access to the Inflight Manual (IFM) if you find yourself in this situation.

If you are at a non-base station and your tablet is missing, inoperative, or unable to update, you are now permitted to use a deadheading or non-revenue Flight Attendant’s tablet to access the IFM. The deadheading/non-rev flight attendant must be traveling on your flight and must provide their consent. If you cannot use another Flight Attendant’s tablet to access the IFM, contact Daily Ops, and a Duty Manager will authorize a downloadable version of the IFM that you will be able to access on your PED temporarily. After arriving at a base station and securing a loaner tablet, you will be required to delete the IFM from your PED. Daily Ops can be contacted at (682) 315-7070

If you cannot access the IFM via either of the methods mentioned above, contact Daily Ops and request a printed manual. Upon arrival at a base station, be sure to exchange the paper manual for a loaner tablet so Flight Service can securely dispose of the paper manual.

Flight Service Base Operation’s contacts and operating hours are in the IFM: Work and Conduct Rules > FA Electronic Device Policies > Base Stations.

For more guidelines on the new ways to access the IFM, refer to the IFM > General Policies and Procedures > Inflight Manual and FA Tablet (EFB) > FA Tablet (EFB) Missing, Inoperative, or IFM Unable to Update.

As always, consider filing a Cabin ASAP report whenever you find yourself with a missing, inoperative, or out-of-date IFM.

For the purpose of the KCM® Program, authorized crewmembers have been defined by the TSA as: Captains or Pilots in Command, First Officers or Co-Pilots, Flight Engineers, Flight Navigators, Flight Attendants and Load Masters for full all-cargo operations. No other individuals are allowed access in the KCM® program.

Crewmembers must be fully certified by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) as applicable; currently employed by the aircraft operator holding an approved TSA security program; have successfully completed the Criminal History Records Check (CHRC) process; be authorized to perform crewmember duties on full all-cargo flights,  scheduled passenger or public/private charter passenger flights operated under an approved security program; and have completed the aircraft operator’s crewmember security training as applicable. Additionally, authorized crewmembers must not be on a leave of absence greater than 30 days, including furloughs and military duty.

Hot Cabin

Keeping passengers and crewmembers comfortable alleviates problems while boarding, especially in cities where temperatures can reach over 100 degrees. Here are some reminders on keeping the aircraft cool on warm days:

  • Coordinate and communicate with crewmembers to ensure comfortable cabin temperatures (Lower Window Shades / Open Air Vents )
  • Review IFM procedures through Crew Duties > Boarding > Prior to Customer Boarding > Guidelines for Boarding a Warm Aircraft
  • Deliver the Warm Weather Cabin announcement (PA card: Arrival > Taxi-In > Warm Weather Cabin) immediately following the Arrival/Taxi-In PA

Report a Hot Cabin incident here

Turbulence

If you sustain an injury due to turbulence, notify the Captain immediately and request the turbulence and injury event be documented. If medical treatment is necessary, it is imperative to let the Captain know as soon as possible.

If you become injured as a result of turbulence, you may be eligible for an Injury on Duty (IOD). View AA IOD Instructions and Information. IODs may be filed 24/7 by calling (844) 777-8463

A triage nurse from Sedgwick will answer your call. You are NOT required to follow the nurse’s recommendations and are free to seek immediate medical treatment. Advise the nurse if you intend to seek urgent medical care. Not all injuries require immediate medical attention. In the event of a medical emergency, do not wait to speak with a nurse- seek immediate medical attention, or go to the nearest hospital emergency room. If follow-up care is needed, be sure to talk with your adjuster at Sedgwick.

All Flight Attendants should file a CERS Report.

It is always important to file a CERS report. The New CERS Report link can be found on your (EFB) tablet or the Flight Service website by clicking on Safety & Security, or you may connect from your mobile device. You can also view the New CERS Report here.

The Company and the APFA EAP recognize the Critical Incident Stress Management Program (CISM) as a collaborative policy which is jointly managed and monitored. CISDs are scheduled for any aircraft accident or serious incident within 24-72 hours following an event and are designed to lessen or avoid the potentially negative impact of a traumatic event.

For more information about turbulence safety, please refer to the Inflight Manual – Safety and Security – General Safety or contact the IOD Department at [email protected].

Inadvertent Slide Deployment (ISD)

Monitor & Challenge

Be sure to perform monitor & challenge before disarming your door(s). Distractions are an unfortunately frequent occurrence during disarming, so if you become distracted during monitor & challenge, restart the process to ensure it has your full focus.

What to do if you have an ISD

Consider filing a Cabin ASAP report immediately.

Types of Inadvertent Slide Deployments

Partial Slide Deployment
A partial slide deployment occurs when a slide pack falls from the bustle but does not fully inflate. On the 737, one of the most common causes of this type of deployment is when the girt bar is not fully secured in the j-hooks beneath the slide bustle, causing the girt bar to catch on an object and pull the slide from the pack.

Full Deployment
Full slide deployments occur exactly as they sound; the slide pack falls from the bustle and fully inflates.

What Happens After an ISD?

If you are at a base station, Flight Service will more than likely come to the aircraft to complete an ISD Data Collection Form. In order to complete this form, the responding FSM must ask you questions about your sequence, when you attended CQ, if any other departments were involved, etc. The ISD Data Collection Form is automatically sent to the appropriate departments at the company as well as APFA Safety & Security.

Cabin ASAP is a voluntary program, but we highly recommend that if you are involved in an ISD event that you strongly consider submitting a Cabin ASAP report. If you choose to submit a report, it is in your best interest to submit it as quickly as possible.

You will be removed PW pending an investigation and asked to participate in an ISD debrief. If you choose not to file a an ASAP report the investigation will be conducted through flight service. The committee that conducts the debrief is comprised of a member of Flight Service Training, Safety Management Systems, Flight Service Policies & Procedures, and APFA Safety & Security. The debrief is non-punitive and the purpose is to hear the sequence of events in your own words. It is imperative that you are honest and provide a detailed account of the events as they happened.

Be sure to consult with your local APFA representatives before meeting with members of management.

Keeping passengers and crewmembers comfortable alleviates problems while boarding, especially in cities where temperatures can reach over 100 degrees. Here are some reminders on keeping the aircraft cool on warm days:

  • Coordinate and communicate with crewmembers to ensure comfortable cabin temperatures (Lower Window Shades / Open Air Vents )
  • Review IFM procedures through Crew Duties > Boarding > Prior to Customer Boarding > Guidelines for Boarding a Warm Aircraft
  • Deliver the Warm Weather Cabin announcement (PA card: Arrival > Taxi-In > Warm Weather Cabin) immediately following the Arrival/Taxi-In PA

Report a Hot Cabin incident here

If you sustain an injury due to turbulence, notify the Captain immediately and request the turbulence and injury event be documented. If medical treatment is necessary, it is imperative to let the Captain know as soon as possible.

If you become injured as a result of turbulence, you may be eligible for an Injury on Duty (IOD). View AA IOD Instructions and Information. IODs may be filed 24/7 by calling (844) 777-8463

A triage nurse from Sedgwick will answer your call. You are NOT required to follow the nurse’s recommendations and are free to seek immediate medical treatment. Advise the nurse if you intend to seek urgent medical care. Not all injuries require immediate medical attention. In the event of a medical emergency, do not wait to speak with a nurse- seek immediate medical attention, or go to the nearest hospital emergency room. If follow-up care is needed, be sure to talk with your adjuster at Sedgwick.

All Flight Attendants should file a CERS Report.

It is always important to file a CERS report. The New CERS Report link can be found on your (EFB) tablet or the Flight Service website by clicking on Safety & Security, or you may connect from your mobile device. You can also view the New CERS Report here.

The Company and the APFA EAP recognize the Critical Incident Stress Management Program (CISM) as a collaborative policy which is jointly managed and monitored. CISDs are scheduled for any aircraft accident or serious incident within 24-72 hours following an event and are designed to lessen or avoid the potentially negative impact of a traumatic event.

For more information about turbulence safety, please refer to the Inflight Manual – Safety and Security – General Safety or contact the IOD Department at [email protected].

Monitor & Challenge

Be sure to perform monitor & challenge before disarming your door(s). Distractions are an unfortunately frequent occurrence during disarming, so if you become distracted during monitor & challenge, restart the process to ensure it has your full focus.

What to do if you have an ISD

Consider filing a Cabin ASAP report immediately.

Types of Inadvertent Slide Deployments

Partial Slide Deployment
A partial slide deployment occurs when a slide pack falls from the bustle but does not fully inflate. On the 737, one of the most common causes of this type of deployment is when the girt bar is not fully secured in the j-hooks beneath the slide bustle, causing the girt bar to catch on an object and pull the slide from the pack.

Full Deployment
Full slide deployments occur exactly as they sound; the slide pack falls from the bustle and fully inflates.

What Happens After an ISD?

If you are at a base station, Flight Service will more than likely come to the aircraft to complete an ISD Data Collection Form. In order to complete this form, the responding FSM must ask you questions about your sequence, when you attended CQ, if any other departments were involved, etc. The ISD Data Collection Form is automatically sent to the appropriate departments at the company as well as APFA Safety & Security.

Cabin ASAP is a voluntary program, but we highly recommend that if you are involved in an ISD event that you strongly consider submitting a Cabin ASAP report. If you choose to submit a report, it is in your best interest to submit it as quickly as possible.

You will be removed PW pending an investigation and asked to participate in an ISD debrief. If you choose not to file a an ASAP report the investigation will be conducted through flight service. The committee that conducts the debrief is comprised of a member of Flight Service Training, Safety Management Systems, Flight Service Policies & Procedures, and APFA Safety & Security. The debrief is non-punitive and the purpose is to hear the sequence of events in your own words. It is imperative that you are honest and provide a detailed account of the events as they happened.

Be sure to consult with your local APFA representatives before meeting with members of management.

JCBA Section 34.H.1. - 1. The Company, upon notification of any aircraft accident, serious incident, or hijacking or terrorist incident in which a Flight Attendant is involved shall notify the APFA National President, APFA SSD Coordinator, and APFA EAP Representative. The Manager of Flight Service or her/his designee shall contact the APFA Base President when Flight Attendant(s) assigned to her/his respective base or involved in such incidents, emergency evacuation, or when a Flight Attendant is injured. If the APFA Base President is unavailable, the Flight Service Base Manager or her/his designee shall contact APFA Headquarters. By mutual agreement, the Company and the Union, may agree upon an alternate notification process. Names and employee numbers of the Flight Attendants will be provided to the Union.

These incidents are defined below:

a. Aircraft Accident: Any and all occurrences associated with the Company’s operation of an aircraft in which any person suffers death or serious injury, or in which the aircraft receives substantial damage.

b. Hijacking or Terrorist Incident: Seizure or attempted seizure of a Company aircraft with Flight Attendants on board by actual or threatened force of violence.

c. Serious Incident: An incident with Flight Attendants on board a Company aircraft involving any of the following:

  • i. Serious injury to a Flight Attendant or any incident where medical personnel are called to an aircraft to assess a Flight Attendant;
    ii. Actual evacuation or cabin preparation for evacuation;
    iii. Fire and smoke on board resulting in injuries;
    iv. Physical assault of a Flight Attendant by a passenger(s);
    v. Aircraft decompression;
    vi. Turbulence resulting in injuries to crew members or passengers;
    vii. Bomb threats;
    viii. Death on board; or
    ix. Any specific terrorist threat assessment issued and permitted to be released by any government agency.

Known Crewmember (KCM®)

You must be logged in to view Known Crewmember (KCM®) information.

TSA

TSA Permitted & Prohibited Items

3-1-1 Liquid Rule

Many stations and countries are becoming stricter when it comes to liquids, gels, and aerosols. This affects customers and non-revs, and crew members may also need to comply with these rules. Information for all destinations may found in the “Destination Information” section of the Inflight Manual inside of Comply365. If you have an NIPD layover (or turn) within a domestic sequence or fly anywhere outside of the Continental US, always confirm the rules that apply for that destination.

There are other destinations, including Hawaii, which have agricultural rules and regulations to follow. Please verify these rules before bringing any food or agricultural products in or out of these destinations.

APFA recommends being 3-1-1 compliant, even if you are going through Known Crewmember® (KCM). Crewmembers in uniform are allowed Liquids, Aerosols and Gels (LAGs), and other exemptions applicable to uniformed flight crewmembers at TSA Pre✓™ lanes and standard passenger screening lanes.

Crewmembers not in uniform are not allowed LAGs exemptions and other exemptions applicable to uniformed flight crewmembers. Crewmembers not in uniform and randomly selected at KCM for extra screening will be required to comply with the 3-1-1 policy per TSA guidelines.

Visit the TSA website

Image provided by TSA

Many stations and countries are becoming stricter when it comes to liquids, gels, and aerosols. This affects customers and non-revs, and crew members may also need to comply with these rules. Information for all destinations may found in the “Destination Information” section of the Inflight Manual inside of Comply365. If you have an NIPD layover (or turn) within a domestic sequence or fly anywhere outside of the Continental US, always confirm the rules that apply for that destination.

Image provided by TSA

There are other destinations, including Hawaii, which have agricultural rules and regulations to follow. Please verify these rules before bringing any food or agricultural products in or out of these destinations.

APFA recommends being 3-1-1 compliant, even if you are going through Known Crewmember® (KCM). Crewmembers in uniform are allowed Liquids, Aerosols and Gels (LAGs), and other exemptions applicable to uniformed flight crewmembers at TSA Pre✓™ lanes and standard passenger screening lanes.

Crewmembers not in uniform are not allowed LAGs exemptions and other exemptions applicable to uniformed flight crewmembers. Crewmembers not in uniform and randomly selected at KCM for extra screening will be required to comply with the 3-1-1 policy per TSA guidelines.

Visit the TSA website

Self Defense

Active crew members of all domestic scheduled carriers are eligible for the Crew Member Self Defense Training Program. The Crew Member Self Defense Training Program provides four-hours of training to prepare active crew members of all domestic scheduled carriers for potential physical altercations both on and off the aircraft. 

You can Register online for the training. To register for this no-cost training, search for the training course near you and submit the online registration form. Reporting instructions will be provided upon registration and successful verification of employment. 

For more information, please email your inquiry or call (703) 487-3309. 

Training

Continuing Qualification (CQ)

Flight Attendants returning from leaves, or who have March or April as their Base Month, will remain plotted in their original scheduled class dates to avoid qualification expiration. If you would like to attend training this month, please contact the Training Support Desk at 800-847-2739, #, 6, 1 for availability and class dates.

Class sizes for CQT is limited to thirty (30) in three (3) groups of ten (10) to adhere to social distancing guidelines. Class size for equipment training classes will be limited to twenty (20) in two groups of ten (10) to adhere to social distancing guidelines. Additional equipment training will be available for MIA (787) and CLT (777).

Flight Attendants with a base month of July will not need to bid in Training Bidding System (TBS). June Base Month Flight Attendants wishing to attend CQT may contact the Training Support Desk after 1200 (CDT) on Saturday, May 23rd to sign up for open training slots. The Training Department is seeking a “grace month” extension from the FAA for the June and July Base Month Flight Attendants comparable to the extension granted for the March through May Base Month Flight Attendants.

If you are currently out on a VLOA or a PVLOA or will be going out on a PVLOA, you will need to contact the Training Support Desk (TSD) or your Flight Service Manager (FSM) to confirm your training requirements and obligations. If you are going out on a Maternity Leave, please coordinate and direct any questions you may have through your Maternity Coordinator.

International

Global Entry

Beginning September 8, conditionally approved Global Entry applicants will be able to complete in-person interviews at most Trusted Traveler Programs enrollment centers in the United States. These applicants must schedule enrollment center interviews in advance by logging into their account on the Trusted Traveler Programs website. Enrollment on Arrival remains operational at participating airports. NEXUS and U.S.-Canada FAST interviews at U.S. and Canadian enrollment centers will remain suspended until further notice. SENTRI and FAST-South enrollments on the southern border may also be limited

Global Entry is a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) program that allows expedited clearance for pre-approved, low-risk travelers upon arrival in the United States. Members enter the United States through automatic kiosks at select airports.

At airports, program members proceed to Global Entry kiosks, present their machine-readable passport or U.S. permanent resident card, place their fingerprints on the scanner for fingerprint verification and complete a customs declaration. The kiosk issues the traveler a transaction receipt and directs the traveler to baggage claim and the exit.

Travelers must be pre-approved for the Global Entry program. All applicants undergo a rigorous background check and in-person interview before enrollment.

While Global Entry’s goal is to speed travelers through the process, members may still be selected for further examination when entering the United States. Any violation of the program’s terms and conditions will result in the appropriate enforcement action and termination of the traveler’s membership privileges.

Visit the Trusted Traveler Program Enrollment

How to Apply for Global Entry

Before you apply, make sure you are eligible for Global Entry. To apply just follow the steps below. Visit Global Entry for more information.

Step 1

Step 1 - TTP Account

Create a Trusted Traveler Programs (TTP) account. Regardless of your age, you must have your own TTP account.

Step 2

Step 2 - Complete the Application

Log in to your TTP account and complete the application. A $100 non-refundable fee is required with each completed application. View AA Reimbursement Information

Step 3

Step 3 - Schedule Interview

After accepting your completed application and fee, CBP will review your application. If your application is conditionally approved, then your TTP account will instruct you to schedule an interview at a Global Entry Enrollment Center. Each applicant must schedule a separate interview. View Interview Locations

Step 3

Step 4 - Interview

You will need to bring your valid passport(s) booklet and one other form of identification, such as a driver’s license or ID card to the interview. If you are a lawful permanent resident, you must present your machine readable permanent resident card. View Interview Locations

Create a Trusted Traveler Programs (TTP) account. Regardless of your age, you must have your own TTP account.

Log in to your TTP account and complete the application. A $100 non-refundable fee is required with each completed application. View AA Reimbursement Information

After accepting your completed application and fee, CBP will review your application. If your application is conditionally approved, then your TTP account will instruct you to schedule an interview at a Global Entry Enrollment Center. Each applicant must schedule a separate interview. View Interview Locations

You will need to bring your valid passport(s) booklet and one other form of identification, such as a driver’s license or ID card to the interview. If you are a lawful permanent resident, you must present your machine readable permanent resident card. View Interview Locations

Passport Renewal

If your passport is expired, or will expire in seven months or less, you must follow the new procedures outlined below and send your documents to a central processing center. Passport agencies are no longer accepting in-person appointments due to COVID-19, apart from documented life or death emergencies. Please follow the steps below, including filling out the form in Comply365 (described in step 6) to notify us that your passport is being renewed. Flight attendants will be temporarily allowed to fly domestic US trips while their passport is being renewed.

You will not be able to use scheduling tools such as TTS (Trip Trade System) and ETB (Electronic Trade Board) if your passport expires in 184 days or less.

Note: The renewal process for crew members is different than the steps listed for the public on the U.S. State Department’s website.

How to Renew Your Passport

Step 1 - Fill Out Application

Visit the State Department’s website at travel.state.gov and fill out a passport renewal application. The form is called a “DS-82: Renewal Application.” (Request the 52-page passport book.) Once it’s filled out, print a PDF copy of your renewal form.

Step 2 - Get a Signed Letter

Visit your local base in person and tell them you need to renew your passport. Managers will give you a signed letter from the company stating that you are in urgent need of a passport renewal. Shipment will need to be made via United States Postal Service (USPS) Priority Mail Express. You can obtain a Priority Mail express flat rate envelope from USPS when shipping to the address below, you will be reimbursed for the shipping cost of $27.10.

National Passport Center
Attention: ACP
44132 Mercure Circle
PO Box 1108
Sterling, Virginia 20166-1108 Attention: ACP

Step 3 - USPS Priority Mail

In the USPS Priority Mail express envelope, please include:

  1. The company letter from your manager
  2. A completed passport application (form DS-82)
  3. A passport photo
  4. Your current passport
  5. Check or money order for $208.32 payable to U.S. Department of State. This amount includes the passport fee, expedite fee and overnight return delivery fee. (You’ll be reimbursed for this fee.)

Step 4 - Tracking Number

Write down or take a picture of the tracking number found on your shipping receipt or the bottom peel-off portion of the USPS Priority Mail Express tracking label.

Step 5 - Notify Daily Ops

Notify Daily Ops that you’ve submitted your passport for renewal by logging into Comply 365 and completing the U.S. passport renewal notification form. This form can be found in Comply 365 using the following path: Comply365 > My Forms > AAFA > US Passport Renewal Notification

This will allow you to work domestic trips while your passport is being renewed

Visit the State Department’s website at travel.state.gov and fill out a passport renewal application. The form is called a “DS-82: Renewal Application.” (Request the 52-page passport book.) Once it’s filled out, print a PDF copy of your renewal form.

Visit your local base in person and tell them you need to renew your passport. Managers will give you a signed letter from the company stating that you are in urgent need of a passport renewal. Shipment will need to be made via United States Postal Service (USPS) Priority Mail Express. You can obtain a Priority Mail express flat rate envelope from USPS when shipping to the address below, you will be reimbursed for the shipping cost of $27.10.

National Passport Center
Attention: ACP
44132 Mercure Circle
PO Box 1108
Sterling, Virginia 20166-1108 Attention: ACP

In the USPS Priority Mail express envelope, please include:

  1. The company letter from your manager
  2. A completed passport application (form DS-82)
  3. A passport photo
  4. Your current passport
  5. Check or money order for $208.32 payable to U.S. Department of State. This amount includes the passport fee, expedite fee and overnight return delivery fee. (You’ll be reimbursed for this fee.)

Write down or take a picture of the tracking number found on your shipping receipt or the bottom peel-off portion of the USPS Priority Mail Express tracking label.

Notify Daily Ops that you’ve submitted your passport for renewal by logging into Comply 365 and completing the U.S. passport renewal notification form. This form can be found in Comply 365 using the following path: Comply365 > My Forms > AAFA > US Passport Renewal Notification

This will allow you to work domestic trips while your passport is being renewed

After You Receive Your Renewed Passport

Immediately update your records in the company’s computer system using the following steps:

  1. Sign into DECS then type HI18/US*
  2. Tab down to “Delete all PSPT Information” type Y
  3. Tab down and hit enter key
  4. Type HI18/US*
  5. Tab to complete all information
  6. Once complete tab to enter and hit the enter key

Then, notify Daily Ops that is complete by calling (682) 315-7070, or by emailing [email protected].

passport-renew-safety

Once you receive your passport and associated documents, you can then use the reimbursement form located on the Flight Service web site (also available by request at your local base), to submit your passport renewal fee as eligible items for reimbursement. You will also be reimbursed up to $15 for your passport photo. Attach your receipt (or a copy of your money order / canceled check) and return your completed reimbursement form to your local base coordinator for processing and payment on your mid-month check.

Finally, with a new passport, visas will remain in the old passport. Please remember you will have to carry both passports until you’re able to get new visas.

Destination Advisories

Know Before You Go: Doha

Take some time to check out the Know Before You Go guide in Comply365 > My Publications > 05 Destination Information > Doha (DOH) Know before you go to better understand the customs and culture of Doha.

London Heathrow Security Protocols

Here are the expectations when transiting LHR (per AA communications on 4/11/22):

DO

  • Cooperate fully with security personnel and comply with their requests
  • Pack accordingly — which includes adhering to the "3-1-1" rule for regular customers. Remember, even though you use KCM when leaving the U.S., you're subject to the 3-1-1 rule on the return flight.
  • Pack neatly – which will expedite any required security searches
  • Use LAG bags (20cm x 20cm /8in x 8in) which are typically available at the checkpoint in case you forgot one. Please ensure that your LAG bag can close properly with all the items inside

DON'T

  • Argue or speak harshly to airport or security officials or interrupt the screeners if you’re selected for secondary screening. Any interruption of a screener while s/he is conducting their duties will further delay the process.
  • Attempt to carry on "full size" toiletries or other “full size” LAGs (liquids, aerosols and gels)
  • Request to use a specific security checkpoint when departing LHR. The driver will be assigned to one based on operational needs.

Remember, what’s acceptable to carry through KCM isn’t necessarily acceptable to carry through security when departing LHR.

Need a refresher on the particular rules of each city? Comply365/Destination Information is your one-stop-shop. Use your iPad (pilots) or iPhone (flight attendants) EFB or your Note 5 (flight attendants only) to access Comply365.

UK Customs: To Bring or Not to Bring

View the pamplet (Part 1 and Part 2) to learn about what you can bring through UK customs and what you should leave out.

Countries Required to Spray Cargo Area

Country
Beliz El Salvador Jamaica
Costa Rica Guatemala Nicaragua
Dominican Republic Honduras Panama

Smoke / Odor / Fume Event

What is a Fume Event?

Cabin air contamination events are when heated oils, lubricants, and fluid residue in the engine leak into the cabin air supply. Cabin air must be replenished; therefore, it consists of 50% air that comes from outside air that is pulled from engines into the air conditioning unit (Auxiliary Power Unit-APU) and 50% is recirculated air. This system of aircraft cabin air can cause contamination when air coming in from the outside through the engines is pulled into the air conditioning unit (APU) and then mixes with oil residue from an oil leak.

Due to aircraft using these bleed air filtration systems, fume events can occur on any airplane except the Boeing 787. The 787 supplies air to the aircraft by avoiding the engines and taking air from outside the aircraft by two inlets and then fed to electric cabin air compressors (CACs).

You will most likely “only” notice the odor and physical symptoms. On occasion, there are reports of people having seen a haze, therefore the only consistent detection system on our aircraft is from flight attendants, pilots, maintenance, or ground workers who either smell the odor and/or exhibit symptoms.

Oil fumes do not usually smell like oil. Oil fumes or hydraulic fluid odor is often described as smelling of musty, stinky locker room, rancid cheese, wet dog, rotten eggs, old garbage, acrid chemical, and sweet. Symptoms of this contamination are called aero-toxic syndrome and can cause short term or long-term illness. The effects can be dizziness, headache, nausea, trouble breathing, abnormal taste, eye, nose, and throat irritation, rash, tingling, fatigue, reduced motor skills/cognitive deficiency.

It is important to understand there are other that other types of fumes you may smell, such as exhaust, fuel, and deicing fluid. Engine fumes from oil, hydraulic fluid, exhaust, and smoke can contain carbon monoxide gas. Exposure to carbon monoxide inflight can be more severe because there is less concentration of oxygen than on the ground. Cabon Monoxide poisoning can cause symptoms, such as dizziness/fainting, headache, and slowed thought processes.

The chemical tri-cresyl-phosphate (TCP) is an organophosphate in engine oil, lubricants, and hydraulic fluids. It is a flame-retardant additive in oils. Exposure to this chemical is toxic and increases the risks of health effects, such as aero-toxic syndrome.

Air contamination by this chemical is harmful. The only detection system on our aircraft are the workers. The only way to know on an air contamination fume event occurrence is from flight attendants, pilots, maintenance, or ground workers who either smell the odor or exhibit symptoms.

The odor is often described as smelling of musty, stinky locker room, rancid cheese, acrid chemical, sweet, wet dog, rotten eggs, or old garbage. Symptoms of this contamination are called aero-toxic syndrome and can cause short term or long-term illness. The effects can be dizziness, headache, nausea, trouble breathing, abnormal taste, eye, nose, and throat irritation, rash, tingling, fatigue, reduced motor skills/cognitive deficiency.

Deicing of aircraft is a required practice for the operation of aircraft by the FAA under FAR 91.527. eCFR :: 14 CFR 91.527 -- Operating in icing conditions. (FAR 91.527) Deicing fluid sprayed on aircraft, Ethelene Glycol, keeps water from freezing on the wings. Ethelene Glycol is more commonly associated with anti-freeze and described as having a sweet odor, but if mixed with other oils and fluids, it can take on other smells, sometimes described as sweet, musty, burnt crayon, oily, burning plastic.

Global Cabin Air Quality Executive (GCAQE) Conference

APFA attended the virtual Global Cabin Air Quality Executive (GCAQE) conference. This event was attended by aviation stakeholders, airline unions, scientists, researchers, doctors, and lawmakers Baroness Bennett of Manor Castle Green peer of UK House of Lords and United States Senator Richard Blumenthal.

Sharing information is critical to finding solutions that will ultimately prevent toxic fume events from contaminating the cabin air supply. While there may not be a silver bullet to solving this problem, we do know there are a lot of ways the airlines could be trying harder. A few key highlights from this conference:

  • Scientific solutions are in development to improve passenger and airplane crews’ safety with aircraft air contamination systems
  • Detecting air contamination with only the nose as the sensor is insufficient, therefore a bleed air monitoring system used in tandem with an alarm detection system is a possible solution.

These solutions are being used in some capacity on commercial aircraft. They need further testing. Air filtration systems remove some contaminants from the cabin air supply, but other harmful volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are unable to be removed, such as Tricresyl phosphates (TCP).

Blood testing measures with the ongoing study led by Dr. Clement Furlong at the University of Washington Department of Genome Sciences and Medicine. He and his team have identified a protein in the plasma fraction of the blood that is modified in the predicted way consistent with the molecular weight of a key metabolite of tricresyl phosphate. They can identify the biomarkers of exposure to this chemical by testing dried blood. There are remaining steps to this becoming a tool to show exposure to these harmful chemicals. Dr. Furlong and his laboratory science team are currently refining the protocol, publishing the study, and need to do more testing with controls, and samples to run. UW Genome Sciences: Clement Furlong (washington.edu)

Airline unions all over the world are saying there needs to be standard policy and medical protocol for our crews so we are safe.

There needs to be a new less toxic oil developed and better detection, standards, regulations, and medical protocol. Until science along with airlines, aircraft manufacturers act more deliberately on this problem, we will stay globally connected and steadfastly committed to airline workers' safety with continued work in all stages. It involves educating, reporting, data gathering, investigation, standards, regulations, medical protocol with following up with a doctor to assure health and safety is the priority.

Fume Event During Flight

If any of the crew members begin to experience any physical symptoms (headache, metallic taste, coughing, irritated eye/nose/throat, dizziness and/or nausea), notify the Captain and coordinate the appropriate medical response.

Not all injuries require immediate medical attention. If you do not see a doctor right away, be advised that you will need to do so within 24 hours of any lost time. In the event of a medical emergency, do not wait to speak with a nurse - go to the nearest emergency room. You must be removed from work by a doctor to become eligible for Work Comp pay benefits once the claim is accepted.

Symptoms Following an Event

If immediately following the flight, you begin to experience any physical symptoms (chest tightness, profound fatigue, muscle aches, sinus congestion and/or a persistent cough), contact the Flight Service Daily Operations desk at IOC (682-315-7070) to report the event and your illness/ injury in order to receive the necessary assistance in seeking immediate medical treatment at the nearest hospital for proper testing of a possible exposure. Recommended testing should include a blood test to determine exposure.

If your injury requires immediate medical attention, go to the nearest emergency room.

File a Report

Each Flight Attendant should file the applicable company report. For all odor/fume events, file an IOD and a CERS Report. Flight Attendants may also consider reporting their specific safety concern regarding the odor/fume event to the Cabin ASAP program for review by AA, APFA and the FAA.

Flight Attendants may also consider reporting their specific safety concern regarding the odor/fume event to:
Cabin ASAP reports are reviewed by the Event Review Committee (ERC) consisting of individuals from APA, APFA, the FAA, and Company.
— Please send reports of suspected odor/fume events to [email protected], [email protected], and [email protected] or file a report with APFA

To read more about the IOD process visit the APFA IOD page.

Workplace Safety

Code N*ARR911 and N*DEP911 in DECS/mobileCCI

This is a helpful code that will provide all local emergency contact information for any destination, whether domestic or international. If you ever need to use one of these phone numbers while on layover, please get in touch with AA IOC Daily Operations or APFA Safety & Security to inform them of any unfolding situation or event. This will help us provide additional support and keep everyone informed.

  • AA IOC Daily Ops: 682-315-7070
  • APFA Safety & Security: 817-540-0108, ext. 8302

On the Plane

  • Watch for potential hazards on the aircraft.
  • Always look above you before standing, as well as looking in the direction you are moving always looking at ground level for any obstacles in the aisle.
  • Be aware of other individuals, activities, and surrounding areas.
  • Always close and latch all doors and compartments after using them to prevent items falling out in turbulence.
  • Always utilize handrails when possible.
  • Always remain vigilant and alert.
  • If you see something, smell something, hear something, say something.

Hotels & Layovers

  • Use local resources. Ask hotel personnel about safe neighborhoods for you to explore while on a layover.
  • Try to avoid consuming mixed drinks. Opt for beverages in a closed can or bottle. Never take a drink from someone you don’t know.
  • Accessories such as watches and jewelry might draw unwanted attention. High-cost PEDs should be kept out of sight as well.
  • Consider going out with someone or keeping your fellow Flight Attendants aware of your plans should you need assistance.
  • Keep your hotel key card in a secure location, and refrain from telling strangers the hotel name or your room number.
  • Practice situational awareness. Try to avoid texting or talking on the phone while walking. Check your surroundings for suspicious activity before taking pictures.
  • Report hotel issues using the Hotel & Transportation Feedback Form

What to Do When a Crewmember Doesn’t Show Up for Pickup

  1. Arrival to Layover – FA #1/Purser or FA Designee take down all crew member hotel room numbers and or cell phone numbers for emergency contact only.
  2. Pickup – If FA(s) are not present in time for pickup/hotel departure, have the hotel front desk call their hotel room(s), and or the provided emergency contact phone number(s).
  3. If No Answer – Call both AA IOC Daily Ops at (682) 315-7070 as well as the APFA Safety and Security Department at (817) 540-0108 ext. 8302, or you may email at [email protected]. * Please note we recommend that you contact both AA IOC Daily Operations as well as APFA Safety and Security when alerting of a FA no show. When contacting; please provide, Date, Time, departing flight information, affected crew member(s) information, as well as the layover hotel so that we may follow up with hotel security.
  4. Request Wellness Check from Hotel Security – After you have called and alerted both AA IOC Daily Ops and APFA Safety and Security, please ask that the hotel send up their security staff to conduct a wellness check on the affected crew member(s).
  5. Call Crew Tracking – After contacting AA IOC Daily Ops and APFA Safety and Security and after advising the hotel to complete the wellness check. Please, contact Crew Tracking to alert of the missing crew member so that operations can take the next steps appropriately with staffing your departing flight.

APFA Headquarters
1004 West Euless Boulevard
Euless, Texas 76040

M-F: 9:00AM - 5:00PM (CT)
Phone: (817) 540-0108

Call APFA

Contract & Scheduling Desk
M-F: 7:00AM - 7:00PM (CT)
Phone: (817) 540-0108

Chat APFA

After-Hours Live Chat
M-F: 3:00PM - 11:00 PM (CT)
Sat-Sun: 9:00AM - 5:00PM (CT)

APFA Events

Financial Planning Seminar

March 7 @ 11:00 am - 1:00 pm

2024 BOD Convention

March 19 @ 9:00 am - March 21 @ 5:00 pm

APFA Headquarters
1004 West Euless Boulevard
Euless, Texas 76040

M-F: 9:00AM - 5:00PM (CT)
Phone: (817) 540-0108

Call APFA

Contract & Scheduling Desk
M-F: 7:00AM - 7:00PM (CT)
Phone: (817) 540-0108

Chat APFA

After-Hours Live Chat
M-F: 3:00PM - 11:00 PM (CT)
Sat-Sun: 9:00AM - 5:00PM (CT)

APFA Events

Financial Planning Seminar

March 7 @ 11:00 am - 1:00 pm

2024 BOD Convention

March 19 @ 9:00 am - March 21 @ 5:00 pm

APFA Headquarters
1004 West Euless Boulevard
Euless, Texas 76040

M-F: 9:00AM - 5:00PM (CT)
Phone: (817) 540-0108

Call APFA

Contract & Scheduling Desk
M-F: 7:00AM - 7:00PM (CT)
Phone: (817) 540-0108

Chat APFA

After-Hours Live Chat
M-F: 3:00PM - 11:00 PM (CT)
Sat-Sun: 9:00AM - 5:00PM (CT)

APFA Events

Financial Planning Seminar

March 7 @ 11:00 am - 1:00 pm

2024 BOD Convention

March 19 @ 9:00 am - March 21 @ 5:00 pm
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